Reconciling the Church to her Hebraic Roots

When the Emmaus Group was founded, one of the goals was to understand God’s prophetic purposes for Israel.   Over the past 2000 years, much erroneous teaching has influenced the church’s position towards Israel, leading to tragic consequences throughout history and which continue today.

The modern State of Israel is, like every other nation in the world, not perfect. However, God has made it very clear that he has chosen the Jewish people as a nation for himself and to be the vehicle through which he would implement his redemptive plan for mankind.  The Emmaus Group works hard to present the church with the truth about Israel, and to actively encourage reconciliation between the church and her roots in order to bring her into obedience and to equip her for what lies ahead.

Every year we run a series of Israel Conferences, to present valuable teaching relating to Israel and God’s prophetic purposes. These are well attended and we would love to have you with us next year!

We travel around the UK speaking to churches, giving presentations and personal testimonies from Jewish, Palestinian and British speakers, who are able to give fascinating insight and present biblical truth as we seek to bring reconciliation where it is so desperately needed. If you are interested in hearing an Emmaus Group talk at your church, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Relevant Articles:

ISRAEL – A THORN IN THE ARAB SIDE

(Download PDF Print-friendly version) As tensions and violence continue in the Middle East with both Palestinians and Israelis hardening their hearts, disciples of Jesus Christ who understand Israel’s unique place in biblical prophecy, must align their thinking with God’s by taking every thought captive to Christ.[i] First and foremost we are citizens of the kingdom of heaven,[ii] so must see the conflict through God’s eyes, not ours. As ambassadors for this kingdom, in all matters pertaining to political-religious conflict, we must seek first the wisdom of our King. Attempting to make sense of the Arab-Israeli conflict through man’s eye is destined only to confuse, divide and cause trouble. To understand what’s happening in this aged dispute we must turn to God’s word. For it is an aged dispute, one that goes back over four thousand years to the first disputes about land, water and inheritance. “The Lord blessed Issac…the man began to prosper, and continued prospering until he became very prosperous.; for he had possessions of flocks and possessions of herds and a great number of servants. So the Philistines envied him.” Genesis 26 12-14. When one reads the name ‘Philistine’ in the Bible one must think Palestine. ‘Filisteen’ is simply the Arabic pronunciation of our word Philistine, from which derives the modern pronunciation Palestine. The early ‘Filisteens’/Philistines/Palestinians envied the early Israelites much as they do today. Abimelech, the Philistine king, said to Isaac “go away from us, for you are much mightier than us” (Gen 26:16). Later in verse 20, we read how Isaac’s herdsmen clashed with the Philistine herdsmen over water (much as they do today). “The...

CONFLICT – AN OPPORTUNITY FOR SPIRITUAL GROWTH

(Download PDF Print-friendly version) Jesus endured conflict during His time on earth, not least with the religious leaders, but also within His own community and family even: “a man’s enemies will be those of his own household.”[i] Therefore, as servants who are not greater than our Master, we shouldn’t be surprised if we see it in our own lives as a result of our faith and obedience to Him. Dictionary definitions for conflict include words such as battle, contention, strife, antagonism, disagreement and dissension, divided loyalties, contend, differ and struggle. If Jesus went through such, we should expect to: “Do not think I came to bring peace on earth. I did not come to bring peace but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law, and a man’s enemies will be those of his own household!” [ii] However, it is our response to conflict that counts, so choosing to respond appropriately is the road to Christian maturity. Sometimes as with Job, He allows conflict to test us in order we learn more about ourselves, therefore it’s not to be feared, but embraced as a valuable learning experience and an opportunity to grow.  Other times He will chastise us for our profit, to lead us to righteousness. Although such discipline doesn’t feel nice, when He chastises you rejoice, for He scourges those He receives as sons.[iii] Family & Church Conflict Family and church conflict is likely as the great sifting takes place in these last days. The Lord’s winnowing fork[iv] will separate those who...

PASSOVER AND THE EASTER TRADITIONS

(Download PDF Print-friendly version) The question of whether Christians should observe Passover, or continue with the well-established tradition of Easter, is one that provokes much reaction amongst believers. To answer this question we must always begin by examining the word of God.   For God’s ways are higher than man’s. Nowhere in the bible will you find the word Easter. The word Easter derives from Ishtar, the moon goddess from ancient Assyria, and is the root of the Germanic name Eostre, a pagan fertility goddess of the Saxon people of northern Europe. Eostre is also the root of the word estrogen, or oestrogen, the primary female sex hormone Ishtar/Eostre’s fertility symbols were eggs and rabbits. The ancient Assyrian new-year celebrations, called Akitu, culminated with the festival of Ishtar, which was the religious celebration of the fertility and pregnancy of the mother goddess as well as the resurrection of her son/husband, Tammuz, ‘the incarnated son of god’, who coincidentally was born on the 25th December! These pagan fertility symbols have become widely accepted in western culture, yet God makes it abundantly clear that we are not to do as the pagans do. Even the origins of the hot cross bun are found in a repeating form of worship, dating back to the days of Ishtar, who was known as the ‘queen of heaven,’ a name later given to Mary the mother of Jesus. Pagans would bake cakes to offer to ‘the queen of heaven’ (just as the idolatrous Israelites did – Jer 7:18) on the Friday before the Easter festival. Sound familiar? “Take heed to yourself you are not ensnared to...